How Children Can Attain Annuity Benefits Past Age 18

Children who suffer the loss of one or both parents can receive annuity benefits up to age 18, but children enrolled full-time in higher education are permitted to these benefits until they turn 22 years old.

However, there is yet another situation where these benefits can continue past these cutoffs. If a child has suffered a physical or mental disability before 18, is not married and cannot support themselves, the benefits can continue until they no longer meet the requirements (if ever).

For a disabled child to qualify for this benefit, the OPM must be provided with the following information about the child:

-Residence
-Education
-Employment

The doctor, your child, sees must also provide information documenting the medical condition.

More information can be found in OPM Form RI 25-43 that can be attained online by going to the Forms tab at www.opm.gov or in an agency personnel office. Should the Social Security Administration have awarded the child with benefits based on documentation that he/she cannot support themselves due to the before 18 mental or physical disability, the OPM will need this letter.

Their monthly benefits are similar to the FERS and CSRS programs, and the same for disability-based or standard benefits. Therefore, a child with one living parent married to an employee or retiree will receive a monthly benefit of $537 up to $1,611 a month divided by the number of children.

If both parents are dead, the child receives $644 a month up to $1,932 divided by the number of children. Cost of living adjustments will increase these numbers each year.

Special Note: Children of FERS or CSRS Offset employees/retirees will get a reduced benefit by the amount the SSA pays to them.

federal employees childrens benefits annuity